Survey Finds Facebook Popularity Declining Among Young Teens

Survey Finds Facebook Popularity Declining Among Young Teens By Brandon Russell | December 28, 2013 New data gathered from a study by anthropologist Daniel Miller suggests teenagers are sick of using Facebook, and in some instances are even “embarrassed” to be associated with the social network. According to Miller, who conducted a 15-month study of social media in eight different countries, the reason teens are shunning Mark Zuckerberg’s online playground is because parents and other family members often use it to keep tabs on them. “You just can’t be young and free if you know your parents can access your every indiscretion,” Miller concluded. Very true, and the phenomenon doesn’t just affect teens; many working adults are finding out that their social media behavior directly effects their real-world life. “Young people care about style and status in relation to their peers, and Facebook is simply not cool anymore,” Miller said. It’s perhaps why other alternatives, such as Instagram and Snapchat, have become so incredibly popular throughout the year. While the younger audience may be shunning Facebook in favor of other social networks, Facebook is hardly troubled by the teenage exodus. Via Wired, the slack of users is being picked up by older generations, including those who “go off to college and enter the ‘real world.’” Users in their early- to mid-20s need to stay in touch somehow, and it appears Facebook is the method of choice. The ephemerality of services like Snapchat apparently don’t appeal to older users who are looking to “maintain long-term relationships.” Even Miller found that teens agree that Facebook is better for maintaining relationships with...

Ex-Google Engineer Shares How Google Maps Calculates Destination Times

Ex-Google Engineer Shares How Google Maps Calculates Destination Times By Brandon Russell | December 28, 2013   It’s always fascinating to learn how our favorite services are made, and ex-Google engineer Matt Laroche this week revealed a few Google Maps secrets. In particular, how the popular mapping service calculates how long it’ll take to get from one point to another. It’s something I rely on on a daily basis getting to and from work—even though the ETAs are ballpark estimates—so it’s cool to see how Google accounts for the different real world factors, and how they affect your eventual travel time. “Google Maps ETAs are based on a variety of things, depending on the data available in a particular area,” Laroche said. “These things range from official speed limits and recommended speeds, likely speeds derived from road types, historical average speed data over certain time periods (sometimes just averages, sometimes at particular times of day), actual travel times from pervious users, and real-time traffic information.” Laroche goes on to explain some of the deeper details companies, not just Google, use to predict actual traffic time, including live traffic and other data sources. But he admits that calculations are just predictions, and there’s no accounting for the unpredictability of traffic. “Don’t expect the best predictions to be accurate any time soon,” Laroche said. “Calculating ETAs is a future-prediction problem, and traffic, while it follows certain patterns, is inherently unpredictable.” Even if Google has all the precise data from every phone, speed limit, and road condition, it’s impossible for the search giant’s mapping service to predict a crash or other auto...

2013 Mac Pro Review: Apple’s New Desktop Boasts Dramatic Redesign, Dramatic Performance

2013 Mac Pro Review: Apple’s New Desktop Boasts Dramatic Redesign, Dramatic Performance Posted 1 hour ago by Darrell Etherington (@drizzled)   Apple’s new Mac Pro is a sight to behold: In black aluminum with an eye-catching cylindrical design, there’s little chance you’ll ever mistake it for any other computer. The previous Mac Pro was iconic too, of course, but this one is also just slightly larger than a football and dimpled on the top with a recess like a jet engine. But the true power lies under the hood, and what’s contained therein will satisfy even the most pressing need for speed. Video Review Facebook Twitter LinkedIn 2013 Mac Pro Review Basics (as reviewed) 3.7 GHz Quad-Core Intel Xeon E5 processor 16GB 1897 MHz DDR3 RAM Dual AMD FirePro D300 graphics cards with 2GB of RAM each 256GB SSD 6 Thunderbolt 2.0 Ports, 4 USB 3.0 802.11ac + Bluetooth 4.0 MSRP: $2,999 Product info page Pros No faster Mac exists under the sun. It’s like having an exhibit from an industrial design museum in your house. Cons It’s super expensive. Bring your own screen/everything. Design Few would argue that Apple’s design for the Mac Pro isn’t unique. It’s been compared to Darth Vader’s iconic look from the original Star Wars movies, and in a less flattering light, called the “trash can” Mac. But when you actually have one sitting on your desk, it’s a very different story. The aluminum surface is cool to the touch, reflective without being shiny, and – somehow – astoundingly reassuring. It’s the modern monolith of desktop computing, and indeed it does harken forward to a...

Target confirms customer PINs were taken in breach, but says data is safe

Target confirms customer PINs were taken in breach, but says data is safe Chris Kanaracus Dec 27, 2013 11:50 AM Target has confirmed that hackers obtained customer debit card PINs (personal identification numbers) in the massive data breach suffered by the retailer during the busy holiday shopping season, but says customers should be safe, as the numbers were encrypted. Some 40 million customer debit and credit cards were affected by the breach, but until now it wasn’t clear that PINs were part of the hackers’ massive haul. ”While we previously shared that encrypted data was obtained, this morning through additional forensics work we were able to confirm that strongly encrypted PIN data was removed,” Target said in a statement on its website Friday. “We remain confident that PIN numbers are safe and secure. The PIN information was fully encrypted at the keypad, remained encrypted within our system, and remained encrypted when it was removed from our systems.” When Target customers use their debit cards, the PIN is secured with Triple DES encryption at the checkout keypads, according to the statement. “Target does not have access to nor does it store the encryption key within our system,” it adds. “The PIN information is encrypted within Targets systems and can only be decrypted when it is received by our external, independent payment processor. What this means is that the ‘key’ necessary to decrypt that data has never existed within Targets system and could not have been taken during this incident.” The company didn’t reveal how many PINs were taken, or whether it even knows the total at this point in its...

HP may squeeze cheap, big smartphones in by year’s end

HP may squeeze cheap, big smartphones in by year’s end By Shawn Knight On December 26, 2013, 2:15 PM It’s no secret that HP is eyeballing a return to the smartphone market. CEO Meg Whitman pointed out last year that the company ultimately had to offer a smartphone for global consumers and if the latest rumor pans out, we could see some new HP handsets hitting the market sooner (much sooner) rather than later. Sources recently told The Information that HP is planning to launch new 6- and 7-inch smartphones by the end of this year. The budget-minded phones would be sold in emerging markets like China, India and the Philippines for between $200 and $250, we’re told, and will run Android. Given the low price, I wouldn’t expect any serious hardware under the hood and as such, they may ultimately never find their way to the US or other competitive markets. HP is no stranger to the mobile market. In 2000, Compaq (later acquired by HP) unveiled the iPAQ, a pocket PC / PDA powered by Windows Mobile. It was followed up by several revisions over the years but was eventually phased out. Years later, HP released multiple products powered by webOS. Unfortunately, the handsets and operating system were unable to compete with the dominant force that is Apple and Samsung, much less smaller manufacturers like HTC, LG and Sony. The whole operation was ultimately discontinued in August 2011. Considering there is less than a week until we turn the page on the New Year, time is ticking on this rumor. Article From :...

Twitter Stock Rallies to a New All Time High

Twitter Stock Rallies to a New All Time High By Jacob Kleinman | December 26, 2013 Shares of Twitter’s stock unexpectedly jumped to an all time high this week, soaring past a $70 per share. The company’s stock is currently priced at $73.82, pushing the entire social network’s market value past $40 billion. It’s unclear exactly why Twitter’s stock performed so well over the past few days, though some analysts believe it’s thanks to the company’s perceived potential to increase ad revenue. The social network went public earlier this year in November at $26 a share before quickly jumping to $45 its first morning, and has since increased in value by 169 percent. Twitter’s strong relationship with the television industry and the promise of increasing ad revenue are two catalysts that have helped drive investor confidence in the company. Still, some analysts view the recent rally as unjustified, and warn that the company’s stock price is primed to crash in the near future. Twitter has yet to issue its first quarterly earnings report as a publicly traded company, and ahead of its IPO, the social network revealed it has yet to turn a profit despite increasing revenues. How the micro-blogging site, which currently boasts a stock price high above Facebook’s $57.97, will fair in the long run is a mystery, but the pressure is definitely on for Twitter to show some real progress in the near future. Source Google Finance Via AllThingsD Article From :...

Keen On… Innovation: Is Silicon Valley Losing Its Mojo?

Keen On… Innovation: Is Silicon Valley Losing Its Mojo? Posted 2 hours ago by Andrew Keen, Columnist Techonomy’s David Kirkpatrick On Innovating Anywhere | Keen On… Perhaps best known for his definitive book about Facebook, David Kirkpatrick is one of tech’s smartest and best informed writers. He now runs a media startup called Techonomy, which — through a series of annual conferences in Detroit and Tucson — focuses on the impact of technological innovation on the broader economy. So when I interviewed Kirkpatrick at one of my FutureCast salons at the AT&T Foundry in Palo Alto, I asked him if Silicon Valley is less critical to the innovation economy than it used to be. The good news for Silicon Valley, according to Kirkpatrick, is that what he calls the local “solar systems” of Google, Facebook and Apple remain extremely important. The less good news, at least for Silicon Valley, is that “it’s becoming really easy to do cool stuff.” So, Kirkpatrick says, innovation is widely distributed right now. And, echoing Chris Schroeder, he identifies Lebanese capital Beirut as a place that is doing particularly cool stuff. But for all his talk of innovation as a “global phenomenon,” the New York City-based Kirkpatrick hasn’t written off Silicon Valley. Indeed, next November he’ll be holding his main Techonomy event in Half Moon Bay where, no doubt, this conversation about Silicon Valley’s place in the innovation economy will be continued. Article From :...

Zuckerberg to Sell $2.3 Billion Worth of Facebook Stock

Zuckerberg to Sell $2.3 Billion Worth of Facebook Stock By Todd Haselton | December 19, 2013 0 Mark Zuckerberg will sell 41.4 million shares of Facebook, Reuters said Thursday. The CEO will rake in about $2.3 billion from the sale, though he will reportedly use a majority of that cash to pay taxes. 18 million shares, worth about $500 million right now, are being gifted to a charity, Zuckerberg said Thursday. ‘Today, in order to lay the foundation for new projects, we’ve made a contribution of 18 million Facebook shares to the Silicon Valley Community Foundation,” the CEO explained, noting that the donation was also on behalf of his wife Priscilla. “Together, we will look for areas in education and health to focus on next. I’m hopeful we’ll be able to have as positive an impact in our next set of projects.” Zuckerberg isn’t the only one walking away with a fatter wallet. One Facebook board member Marc Andreessen will sell 1.65 million shares, Reuters said, and Facebook itself will also offer up 27 million shares for additional cash. Zuckerberg’s sale does come at a cost: he has diluted his ownership in the company from 58.8 percent to 56.1 percent. Source Reuters (CNBC), Busines Insider Article From :...

The Kano Build-it-yourself Computer For Kids Raises $1.4M On Kickstarter

The Kano Build-it-yourself Computer For Kids Raises $1.4M On Kickstarter Posted 3 hours ago by Mike Butcher (@mikebutcher)   Built on top of the Raspberry Pi, Kano is a build-it-yourself computer which launched on Kickstarter with the aim of pulling in $100,000 in crowd funding to get 1,000 of its Kano kits to market by summer 2014. It’s only six hours away from closing its campaign and has raised just over $1.4 million so far. The kits are for an an “end-to-end computer”, costing $99, which arrives in pieces so the curious – this is mainly aimed at kids – can put it together. Kano’s very simple guidebooks lead the kid on to start coding and building stuff. This is a simple, fun, step-by-step computer kit which makes the Raspberry Pi a lot more accessible. Kano comes with Keyboard, SD card, makeable casing, case mods, an operating system, lots of games and levels, a DIY speaker, and Level books with dozens of hours of projects. Kano is not just repackaging Pi hardware but building its own software on an operating system, Kano OS — built on top of Debian Linux (using the Debian Wheezy distro) — and a Scratch-esque visual coding environment called Kano Blocks. Kano Blocks look like this and show a game of Pong, and Minecraft constructions: Kano is starting with the idea of serving a global and emerging markets, starting with English, Spanish, Arabic and Mandarin versions of its kit’s guidebooks. It’s also working on adding more languages, including Hindi. The startup has also taken in seed funding from friends & family to develop the kit...